Colin O’Brady: Rekord in der Antarktis Einmal alleine durch die Antarktis

Als erster Mensch hat Colin O’Brady die Antarktis alleine und ohne Hilfe überquert. Am Mittwoch (26. Dezember) den 26.12.2018 erreichte der 33-jährige Colin O’Brady nach eigenen Angaben sein Ziel am Ross-Schelfeis. Foto: Colin OBrady/AP 5 Bilder
Als erster Mensch hat Colin O’Brady die Antarktis alleine und ohne Hilfe überquert. Am Mittwoch (26. Dezember) den 26.12.2018 erreichte der 33-jährige Colin O’Brady nach eigenen Angaben sein Ziel am Ross-Schelfeis. Foto: Colin O'Brady/AP

Rekord im ewigen Eis: Der Amerikaner Colin O’Brady ist der erste Mensch, der die Antarktis alleine und nur mit Muskelkraft durchquert hat.

Leben: Markus Brauer (mb)
WhatsApp E-Mail LinkedIn Flipboard Pocket Drucken

Washington - Als erster Mensch hat der US-Abenteurer Colin O’Brady die Antarktis alleine und ohne Hilfsmittel durchquert. Nach 1482 Kilometern auf Langlaufskiern erreichte der 33-Jährige am Mittwoch nach 54 Tagen sein Ziel am Ross-Schelfeis am Pazifischen Ozean, wie er im Online-Dienst Instagram und auf Facebook mitteilte.

Sieh dir diesen Beitrag auf Instagram an

Day 54: FINISH LINE!!! I did it! The Impossible First ✅. 32 hours and 30 minutes after leaving my last camp early Christmas morning, I covered the remaining ~80 miles in one continuous “Antarctica Ultramarathon” push to the finish line. The wooden post in the background of this picture marks the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf, where Antarctica’s land mass ends and the sea ice begins. As I pulled my sled over this invisible line, I accomplished my goal: to become the first person in history to traverse the continent of Antarctica coast to coast solo, unsupported and unaided. While the last 32 hours were some of the most challenging hours of my life, they have quite honestly been some of the best moments I have ever experienced. I was locked in a deep flow state the entire time, equally focused on the end goal, while allowing my mind to recount the profound lessons of this journey. I’m delirious writing this as I haven’t slept yet. There is so much to process and integrate and there will be many more posts to acknowledge the incredible group of people who supported this project. But for now, I want to simply recognize my #1 who I, of course, called immediately upon finishing. I burst into tears making this call. I was never alone out there. @jennabesaw you walked every step with me and guided me with your courage and strength. WE DID IT!! We turned our dream into reality and proved that The Impossible First is indeed possible. “It always seems impossible until it’s done.” - Nelson Mandela. #TheImpossibleFirst #BePossible

Ein Beitrag geteilt von Colin O'Brady (@colinobrady) am

125 Kilometer in 32 Stunden

Kurz vor Schluss machte der frühere Profi-Triathlet noch eine gewaltige Kraftanstrengung: Die letzten 125 Kilometer legte er an einem Stück in 32 Stunden zurück. Bereits 1996/1997 hatte der Norweger Borge Ousland die Antarktis alleine durchquert. Er hatte sich aber teilweise von einem Gleitschirm ziehen lassen.

O’Brady verzichtete auf ein solches Hilfsmittel wie auch auf die Möglichkeit, sich während der Tour mit Lebensmitteln versorgen zu lassen. Der Extremsportler, der bereits als Schnellster die sieben höchsten Gipfel der Erde bezwungen hat, war am 3. November zeitgleich mit dem 49-jährigen Briten Louis Rudd vom Union-Gletscher gestartet. Ihre Wege trennten sich dann.

Sieh dir diesen Beitrag auf Instagram an

Day 55: STANDING ON THE SHOULDERS OF GIANTS. I slept in this morning for the first time, camped right at the final waypoint. Wow...that was the deepest and most satisfying sleep of my life. I'm going to sit tight here at the finish and wait for Lou to complete his crossing. Captain Louis Rudd is one of the most accomplished polar explorers to ever live and a distinguished member of the British Special Forces. It has been an honor to strive for the same goal - the first to complete a solo, unsupported, unaided crossing of Antarctica. I'm looking forward to greeting him here at the finish line and congratulating him on his extraordinary accomplishment. We will step into the history books together as the only two people to have completed such a crossing. There is a lineage of explorers who have come before me that gave me great inspiration to complete my quest. The Impossible First project is simply me standing on their shoulders. Without them paving the way for what was possible, I never could have done this. It’s too long of a list to name everyone, but I want to acknowledge some folks who have personally inspired me: Ernest Shackleton, Felicity Aston, Ryan Waters @ryanwatersphoto , Cecilie Skog @skogcecilie , Ben Saunders @polarben, Henry Worsely, and Børge Ousland @borgeousland. A special acknowledgement goes to Dixie Dansercoer @dixie.dansercoer who is not only a great pioneer in the polar regions and a huge inspiration, but also mentored me throughout my preparation. Hopefully my project inspires others to push the envelope even further. I’m looking forward to cheering others on as we continue to push the limits of human potential in the polar regions and beyond. #TheImpossibleFirst #BePossible

Ein Beitrag geteilt von Colin O'Brady (@colinobrady) am

Scheinbar unmögliche Idee

O’Brady, der wie Rudd einen 180 Kilogramm schweren Schlitten hinter sich herzog, erreichte am 12. Dezember nach 40 Tagen den Südpol. Die Etappen seines Abenteuers wurden durch GPS aufgezeichnet und auf O’Bradys Internetseite www.colinobrady.com veröffentlicht.

Beim Frühstück am Weihnachtstag beschloss er nach eigenen Angaben, die letzten 125 Kilometer in einem Stück zurückzulegen. „Als ich das Wasser für meinen Haferbrei kochte, ist mir eine scheinbar unmögliche Idee gekommen“, schrieb der 33-Jährige auf Instagram.

Sieh dir diesen Beitrag auf Instagram an

Day 49: PEACEFUL WARRIOR. When I was 9 years old, my Mom read aloud to me the book The Way of the Peaceful Warrior by Dan Millman @danmillmanpw . It was a seminal moment for me that continues to have deep ripple effects on my life today. I woke up to the wind storm still hammering my tent, but the peaceful warrior that lives inside of me was also awakened. Immediately as I opened my eyes and unzipped my sleeping bag, a deep strength overcame me and I knew today would be special, despite the constant 40mph wind gusts and -25 temperature. I tapped into one of the deepest flow states of my life for the next 13 hours and made my furthest distance of the entire expedition. 33.1 miles!! It’s amazing tapping into this deep inner peace and strength, but let me be clear; I am not unique in this ability. We all have reservoirs of untapped potential and our bodies and spirits are capable of so much more than lies on the surface. Believe that the next time you need more strength than you think you have, it’s inside of you. I promise. #TheImpossibleFirst #letsbepossibletogether

Ein Beitrag geteilt von Colin O'Brady (@colinobrady) am

„Die herausforderndsten Stunden meines Lebens“

„Ich habe mich gefragt, ob es möglich wäre, den ganzen Weg bis zum Ziel in einem Rutsch zurückzulegen. Als ich mir die Stiefel geschnürt habe, war aus dem unmöglichen Plan ein festes Ziel geworden.“ „Die letzten 32 Stunden waren einige der herausforderndsten Stunden meines Lebens“, schrieb O’Brady.

„Es waren aber ehrlich gesagt auch einige der besten Momente, die ich jemals erlebt habe.“ Der Brite Rudd lag rund ein oder zwei Tage zurück, als O’Brady sein Ziel erreichte.

Sieh dir diesen Beitrag auf Instagram an

Day 52: SAVOR AND FOCUS. Somehow I am still going uphill 🤦‍♂️. I spent the first 6 hours of the day climbing up again to 8300ft (only 1000ft net lower than the Pole). I feel like I am stuck in an M.C. Echer drawing where every direction leads up, a never ending staircase. In this photo I finally crested the big hill looking out on the mountains that lead to my finish line at sea level. Perhaps now I really am going down for good. In these final days I’m reminding myself of two things: First - savor these moments. I’m very eager to finish, but before I know it, I’ll be reflecting on this adventure with nostalgia. So while I’m still out here, I’m trying to enjoy it as much as possible. The second thing is - I need to stay hyper focused on execution. It’s not over until it’s over. Henry Worsely, who was a huge inspiration of mine, tragically lost his life less than 100 miles from completing this traverse. When I was crossing Greenland earlier this year on my very last night, I decided to relax my usual evening routine and didn’t check my campsite well enough and fell waist deep into a crevasse that was 200ft deep. If I’d fallen all the way to the bottom, it could have been game over. It’s often at the end when we are tired that mistakes happen. So for that reason I’m ensuring that I stay hyper focused on all of the details. Merry Christmas Eve everyone. Dear Santa🎅, All I want for Christmas is a stable high pressure weather system to bring 🌞 and no wind. Sincerely, Colin #TheImpossibleFirst #BePossible

Ein Beitrag geteilt von Colin O'Brady (@colinobrady) am

Heldentat der Polar-Geschichte

Die „New York Times“ würdigte die Leistung des US-Abenteurers als „eine der bemerkenswertesten Heldentaten der Polar-Geschichte“. Sie sei vergleichbar mit dem Rennen zum Südpol, das sich der Norweger Roald Amundsen und der Brite Robert Falcon Scott 1911 geliefert hatten.

2016 war der britische Armeeoffizier Henry Worsleybei dem Versuch ums Leben gekommen, die Antarktis alleine und ohne Hilfsmittel zu durchqueren. Andere Abenteurer gaben unterwegs auf. Dass O’Brady einmal die Durchquerung der Antarktis gelingen würde, wäre vor Jahren undenkbar gewesen: Laut Angaben auf seiner Website hatte er sich bei einem Unfall in Thailand 2008 auf einem Viertel seines Körpers Verbrennungen zugezogen. Die Ärzte hätten ihm damals gesagt, er werde nie mehr normal laufen können.

Sieh dir diesen Beitrag auf Instagram an

Day 51: MOUNTAINS!! After getting pounded in a storm for four days Antarctica decided to loosen its grip on me for one glorious bluebird and wind free hour. It’s too small to make out in the photos but the break in the weather revealed that I could see the tops of the Trans-Antarctic mountains. This was VERY significant to me for two reasons and had me jumping for joy. 1) I haven’t seen any other natural features other than endless shades of white snow and ice since back on day 17. Seeing anything new on the horizon was simply incredible. 2) More importantly my finish line lies just on the other side of those mountains!!! It was only an hour of calm before the wind kicked up again. The next two days are forecast to be whiteout and worse again as Antarctica 🇦🇶 seems determined to keep testing me to the bitter end, but I’m determined to keep making progress every day. Less than 100 miles to go now! Onward. #TheImpossibleFirst #BePossible

Ein Beitrag geteilt von Colin O'Brady (@colinobrady) am

Seven Summits in 132 Tagen

Doch allen Prognosen zum Trotz trainierte O’Brady für seinen ersten Triathlon, wie es auf der Website heißt. Als Bergsteiger stellte er 2016 einen Rekord auf: Er bestieg als bislang Schnellster die sieben höchsten Gipfel der Erde – in nur 132 Tagen.

Der in Portland im nordwestlichen US-Bundesstaat Oregon geborene O’Brady studierte an der Eliteuniversität Yale Wirtschaft und gehörte dort zur Schwimm-Mannschaft.

Sieh dir diesen Beitrag auf Instagram an

January 2016 at the South Pole. This photo was taken at the beginning of my Explorers Grand Slam expedition. Less than three years later, I’m looking forward to passing through there again! I’m 30 days into my journey to complete a solo, unsupported, unaided crossing of Antarctica. Yesterday I reached 87 degrees the final waypoint before turning my path directly toward the Pole. Today, I’m ~170 miles from the South Pole and making my way one step at a time! If you haven’t seen the Sunday @NYTimes article already, pick up a copy today. Top of the fold cover of Sunday Sports, the article features a day in the life rundown of what my hour-by-hour routine looks like as I cross Antarctica. @jennabesaw tells me there is a beautiful illustration of my IG photo update from Day 15. I can’t wait to see it; will someone save me a copy? 😉 Thanks again to @adamskolnick for reporting. Link in Bio. Check it out! And, be on the lookout for my regular evening IG update later today. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/29/sports/antarctica-ski-race.html

Ein Beitrag geteilt von Colin O'Brady (@colinobrady) am




Unsere Empfehlung für Sie